North America's largest non-profit pet adoption website

The shelter can be an extremely stressful atmosphere for a dog or cat. Think about it: no matter if the pet was relinquished by his owner, lost on the street, or a stray, he suddenly finds himself in a completely foreign place. To make matters worse, he’s surrounded on all sides by other extremely stressed animals and constant loud barking. Strangers walk by his kennel all day. These are just a few of the ingredients that combine to create a perfect storm of anxiety. This stress can even cause the pet to develop temporary behavior issues, which can make potential adopters overlook him. You can help! Volunteer to pet and comfort dogs and cats in the shelter. A little love and individual attention goes a long way. If you’re working with dogs, take each of them for a walk as part of your time together. Once away from the shelter, find some grass to sit on and let the petting and loving begin! With cats, ask the shelter manager if you can take each cat into a quiet room, if there’s one available. Another idea: organize a whole petting brigade of friends, or hold a “pet-a-thon” and get your friends and family members to sponsor you for each dog and cat you pet during your event. Donate the money you raised to the shelter, or buy them some treats or supplies! Enlist your pet-loving friends to join your pet-a-thon, too.

Receive useful adoption info and helpful tips and tricks for training your new adopted pet.

Free pets are much more likely to be abandoned, and in some cases, someone might be seeking to obtain a pet for free to use for an illegal purpose such as dog fighting. You should charge an adoption fee that is equal to or greater than the adoption fee charged by your local animal shelter for that type of pet. Don't be shy to charge money for your pet! Having someone pay money for a pet is one of the most important ways to be assured that the person who is taking the pet is serious about wanting them, and can afford to pay for the food and veterinary care the pet will need throughout his/her life. If you do not want to keep the money you receive for the pet, you can donate it to your local shelter or rescue. You can also offer to hold it as a veterinary fund for the pet. That is a great way to ensure that the adopter is serious about wanting the pet, the pet has a small fund for veterinary care, and you will continue to be able to monitor the health of your pet.

North America's largest non-profit pet adoption website

Receive useful adoption info and helpful tips and tricks for training your new adopted pet. Never adopt a pet on a whim or because you feel it’s love-at-first-sight. Do your research and carefully consider all the aspects and implications of adopting before you make a decision.

North America's largest non-profit pet adoption website

Sure, Cockapoo puppies are super-cute, but simply put, puppies can be adorable, relentless machines of destruction. Even the most well-behaved puppy will destroy shoes, clothing, paper, remote controls, telephones, leashes, dog beds, carpeting…anything and everything. More rambunctious pups have been known to obliterate sofas, car seats, Venetian blinds, electrical cords, door frames…you name it, they can eat it or shred it. And when they're teething, look out! Cute puppies have very sharp teeth, and they are happy to use your hands, feet, nose, hair, etc, as a chew toy. Ouch! Needless to say, a teething Cockapoo puppy and a small child do NOT make good companions! To keep the puppy from hurting himself, and to prevent the destructive behavior from becoming a bad habit, you will need to spend every waking moment supervising his every move. Do you have that kind of time?

North America's largest non-profit pet adoption website